Curious about curiosity

So that's what a triangle is!
I know all kids put things in their mouth in an effort to figure out what something is, but The Kid is just a little different (I'm sure this belief has something to do with my personal bias).  They day we met her, I wore a button down shirt.  She had never seen a button before and spent a good chunk of our visit trying to figure out what buttons were.  She pulled and stared at them before she put one in her mouth.

She is not content until she figures out what something is, or at least that's what it seems like.  Since The Kid speaks more Wookie than she does English or Spanish, I'm not quite sure what she is thinking when she spends time studying things but I am darn sure it is fun to watch.

We've spent considerable time rubbing the decals on the wall above her changing table, noticing the difference in texture between the decal and the wall.  The baby in the mirror provides for countless hours of mirth, even though she can't figure out why the baby doesn't follow her when she goes around the corner.  Toes are fascinating too, especially Papa's.  So are baby wipes, spoons and dog toys.         

The wonder in her eyes is priceless when she sees something for the first time.  While I know Gladys and I could do without her putting everything in her mouth, watching her progress through her process to figure things out is fun to watch.  She has a natural curiosity about everything, which is a gift I hope  The Kid never loses.  

And that's why I titled my post "Curious about curiosity."  I am curious about it.  When do we lose that fascination with how things work?  Why do we lose it?  Can we get it back?  What would my world be like if I just took a little more time myself to wonder why?  How do I make sure she stays curious as long as possible?  

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